.

Gives access to the anglophone version of the site's homepage

Gives access to the basic information of the site, to the history of the Shroud as well as to the study of the cloth.

Gives access to the images on the Shroud, their macroscopic analysis and, when necessary, complementary studies.

Gives the main conclusions that can be drawn from the study of the Shroud : the definite, the uncertain, the hypotheses.

Reconstruction of the Passion of Jesus in the light of the Gospels and of the observations derived from the study of the Shroud.

Shows the page before the one you are reading, if you were reading a book it would take you back a page.

Gives access to general information concerning the images on the Shroud : its aspect of "photo negative", the general study of the yellow traces which form the silhouette of the body, study of the pinkish traces which correspond to the wounds and to the flows of blood, the other images visible on the shroud ( traces of the small coins, traces of writing...)

.

Gives access to the detailed study of the images visible on the Shroud, focussing in particular on their anatomo-pathological and physio-pathological aspects.

Shows the page that follows the one you are reading, as if you were turning over the page of a book.

Gives access to pages containing complementary information about the Shroud. .

Click on FAQ to access the frequently asked questions forum, and on MAJ to find the latest pages

.

gives access to the Table of contents of the site, from which you can access each chapter

.

Detailed study

THE STUDY OF THE HEAD                    Gives access to the glossary where are some definitions of the main terms used in this study and which deserve some additional explanations.

The head
The trunk
The upper limbs
The lower limbs
Removing
At first sight :

                           Blood running in the hair and on the forehead.

With a little attention :

Absence of the right-hand, exterior part of the moustache and beard.

In observing carefully :

Abrasion and swelling of the nose, with breaking of the dorsal cartilage close to the nasal bone.

Abrasion and swelling of the right cheekbone.

                Swelling of both eyebrows.


Real appearance, with only slight contrast enhancement, of the face on the Shroud. The left of the face is situated left of the image. The "photographic negative"aspect of the image is quite visible, contrasting with the "positive" aspect of the blood stains whose colour had so impressed Pierre Barbet. (4889 bytes)
Aspect of the back of the head, the neck and the upper part of the back, as it appears after boosting the contrast. The left part of the head is situated to the right of the image. (9824 bytes)
                    In the hair, especially at the back, we can see many thick streaks of blood, which all seem to stop along the same line, almost horizontal, as if they had met an obstacle. On the front of the head we can see a big clot (in the area coloured green on the image). It starts at the limit of the hair, goes down to the left eyebrow, where it stops, and then continues on the eyebrow. It is blood from a vein, slow flowing, and caused by the rupture of a frontal vein. On the right, another clot, (in the part coloured blue) also starts at the limit of the hair, and goes down on the hair in two distinct straight streaks. It is the trace of the puncturing or breaking of the right frontal artery, which runs thinly, with pulsations, and which sent a small jet of blood some distance. Left, many small clots disseminated on the hair and forehead. We notice that here again, the traces stop along a horizontal line, situated just above the eyebrows. Everything occurs as if the head had been bound with a tight, circular head-band.
The green and blue highlights allow easy identification of the clots. Since this is the real aspect of the Shroud, the left side of the body is situated left of the image. (3100 bytes)

The clot from a vein, as it can be seen on the Shroud, and its image after the application of 3D filter

The clot coming from the flow of venous blood is situated in the green highlight on the left image. (1802 bytes) The clot from an artery, as it appears on the Shroud, and its image after the application of a 3D filter The clot resulting from a blood flow of arterial origin is represented in the blue highlight in the left image. (1304 bytes)
Appearance in relief of the clot resulting from a venous flow. This is a pure computer image, produced by application of a mathematical filter. (1574 bytes) Appearance in relief of a clot due to the breaking of a frontal arterial. This is a purely computerised image by application of a mathematical filter. (1167 bytes)
 

                    Scalp wounds always bleed abundantly, so we are obviously faced with a scattering of numerous wounds, and not one widespread wound of the scalp which would have produced a wider streak of blood. This scattering of wounds can be found all over the scalp, but they spare the face and the nape of the neck. Let's remember that the discovery of double circulation of the arteries and veins dates back only to the start of the 17th century, and no artist of the middle ages would have known this, so could one have painted blood streaks so meticulously, and faithful to physio-pathology.

                   The right end of the moustache, and part of the beard, also on the right, are missing. They were probably torn off.

                    The right cheekbone is bruised, the skin scraped off, the ridge of the nose swollen at the level of the cartilages. The cartilages had probably been broken. The two eyebrows are prominent and bruised.

                    Taken together these wounds indicate that the man in the Shroud had been a victim of physical abuse. He had received several violent blows to his face from fists or a stick. According to Judica this would correspond to a stick of 4 to 5 cms diameter coming from the right hand side. Part of the man's beard and moustache had been torn off. The wounds, in particular, that to the artery, were inflicted while the victim was alive (Just after death the arteries empty themselves). It is therefore impossible to believe that a forger had used a dead body (which had died under other circumstances) to create the image on the Shroud.

Shows the page before the one you are reading, if you were reading a book it would take you back a page.

top.gif (1293 octets)

Shows the page that follows the one you are reading, as if you were turning over the page of a book.